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How Can Occupational Therapists Address Urinary Incontinence in Nursing Homes?

Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS

October 1, 2023

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Question

How can occupational therapists address urinary incontinence in nursing homes?

Answer

Occupational therapists can play a crucial role in addressing urinary incontinence in nursing homes by collaborating with other healthcare professionals to develop individualized care plans for residents. They can focus on behavioral interventions, medication management, and exercises like Kegel exercises to help improve continence outcomes. Additionally, they can work towards reducing the psychosocial costs associated with incontinence by providing support and education to both residents and their families or caregivers. Occupational therapists should be familiar with Tag F690, a significant guideline in state surveys, emphasizing the responsibility of providers to ensure that residents admitted with bladder and bowel incontinence receive the necessary services and assistance to maintain continence, except when their clinical condition makes it impossible. By taking a comprehensive and proactive approach, occupational therapists can significantly contribute to enhancing the quality of life for those affected by urinary incontinence in nursing homes.

 

This Ask the Expert is an edited excerpt from the course, Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction And Continence Improvement: A Primer For Occupational Therapy, by Kathleen Weissberg.


kathleen weissberg

Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS

Dr. Kathleen Weissberg, in her 31 years of practice, has worked in rehabilitation and long-term care as an executive, researcher, and educator. She has established numerous programs in nursing facilities; authored peer-reviewed publications on topics such as low vision, dementia quality care, and wellness; has spoken at numerous conferences both nationally and internationally. She provides continuing education support to over 40,000 individuals nationwide as National Director of Education for Select Rehabilitation. She is a Certified Dementia Care Practitioner, Certified Montessori Dementia Care Practitioner, and a Certified Fall Prevention Specialist. She serves as the Region 1 Director for the American Occupational Therapy Association Political Action Committee and is an adjunct professor at Gannon University in Erie, PA.

 


Related Courses

Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction And Continence Improvement: A Primer For Occupational Therapy
Presented by Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS
Video

Presenter

Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS
Course: #5938Level: Introductory2 Hours
  'The depth of information that was presented, the anatomy review and the slides that were used in the explanations'   Read Reviews
This seminar provides an overview of anatomy and physiology of normal voiding and muscle function related to continence. Different types of incontinence are identified, and assessment/treatment strategies are offered for each. The role of OT in continence improvement is explored.

Multisensory Stimulation Rooms for Persons with Dementia: Design on a Dime
Presented by Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L
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Course: #5180Level: Intermediate1 Hour
  'detailed, pictures, videos, examples'   Read Reviews
This session reviews the benefits and limitations of sensory stimulation for persons with dementia and design factors to consider when designing a multi-sensory space. This session will offer a “design on a dime” approach to a sensory room and demonstrates to occupational therapists how they can assist communities in designing a space to impact the quality of life without relying on pharmacology.

Fall Management: Evidence-Based Interventions for Screening and Intervention
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Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L
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  'Very comprehensive, easy to understand, thorough explanations and will compliment my work'   Read Reviews
This session will review evidence-based screening and intervention strategies applicable to a balance and falls management program including research-based exercise programs, environmental modification, patient and caregiver education and balance retraining activities. Falls management program rationale and implementation is also discussed as well as interdisciplinary techniques and strategies to reduce fall risk in the elderly.

Bullying Among Older Adults: Not Just A Playground Problem
Presented by Kathleen Weissberg, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP
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Course: #5660Level: Introductory1 Hour
  'Very informative topic since bullying happens in all ages'   Read Reviews
The definition and incidence of bullying in adult living communities and day centers including what older adult bullying looks like in this population are reviewed in this session. Characteristics of older adult bullies as well their targets and gender differences will be explored. The reasons why bullying occurs as well as the five different types of bullies are defined. Interventions for the organization, the bully, and the target will be reviewed to help communities minimize (and prevent where possible) bullying and mitigate the effects on the target. Addressing bullying behavior among older adults is critically important for enhancing quality of life and promoting emotional well-being; strategies to create caring and empathic communities for all residents and staff members are also reviewed.

Fostering Meaning And Purpose For Individuals In Senior Living
Presented by Kathleen Weissberg, MS, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS
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Kathleen Weissberg, MS, OTD, OTR/L, CMDCP, CDP, CFPS
Course: #5937Level: Introductory1 Hour
  'Wonderful ideas on how to engage residents in the facilities '   Read Reviews
Despite such positive outcomes of meaningful engagement, recent studies have suggested that elderly residents are inactive most of their time, are engaged in passive activities, and do not experience significant verbal interaction with their caregivers. This session explores meaningful activities by focusing on the intersection of the individual, his/her occupations, and the environment. Participants are offered techniques for soliciting individual preferences, interests, roles, and hobbies and using these to encourage client choice and control over activities and occupations of interest.

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